“Culture and Financialization: Four Approaches” (2020)

Citation Haiven, Max. 2020. “Culture and Financialization: Four Approaches.” In The Routledge International Handbook of Financialization, edited by Natasha van der Zwan, Daniel Mertens, and Philip Mader. London and New York: Routledge. Abstract This chapter briefly examines the relationship between culture and financialization from four inter-related angles. First, we explore the finance culture. Here I …

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“The Art of Unpayable Debts” (2019)

Citation Haiven, Max. 2019. “The Art of Unpayable Debts.” In The Sociology of Debt, edited by Mark Featherstone. London: Policy. Abstract This chapter provides a reading and a contextualisation of three recent performative public artworks to map the way unpayable debts manifest across politics, economics, culture and society under the global order of financialised capitalism. …

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Counterspeculations scholarly audiotour of the City of London

In May of 2018 my colleague Aris Komporozos-Athanasiou and I organized a collaborative walking tour of the City of London historical financial district to explore the connections between finance and the imagination. In October of that year University College London’s Urban Laboratory published the audio of that walk along with an interactive map, which can …

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Colonial Debts, Extractive Nostalgias, Imperial Insolvencies intervention series

In September 2018 the UK-based scholarly online platform Discover Society published a short selection of texts edited by Clea Bourne, Paul Gilbert, Max Haiven and Johnna Montgomerie as part of their larger series of inquiries under the heading of Finance Capital and the Ghosts of Empire. The pieces in the special section are as follows: …

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RYBN: Psychogeographies of the Financial Imaginary

As part of the Counterspecualtions tour of the City of London I organized with Aris Komporozos-Athanasiou I conducted this interview with the French art ensemble RYBN, originally published in a series about the tour by Public Seminar, the online platform of the New School for Social Research in New York. Psychogeographies of the Financial Imaginary: …

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Participatory Art within, against and beyond Financialization (Cultural Studies)

Citation Haiven, Max. 2018. “Participatory Art within, against and beyond Financialization: Benign Pessimism, Tactical Parasitics and the Encrypted Common.” Cultural Studies 32 (4): 530–59. https://doi.org/10.1080/09502386.2017.1363260 Abstract This essay examines three critical artists who orchestrate participatory spectacles and experiences as a means of challenging neoliberal financialization, an overarching paradigm and process that is reshaping economics, politics, …

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The Financialized Imagination – TOPIA 30/31 (2014)

In 2014 I, along with Jody Berland, edited a special double issue of TOPIA: Canadian Journal of Cultural Studies on “The Financialized Imagination.”  It is now in the public domain and can be found here: https://utpjournals.press/toc/topia/30-31 Introduction: The Financialized Imagination (In Memory of Stuart Hall),  Max Haiven and Jody Berland Imagined Economies: Austerity and the …

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The Creative and the Derivative: Historicizing Creativity under Post-Bretton Woods Financialization (2014)

Citation Haiven, Max. 2014. “The Creative and the Derivative: Historicizing Creativity under Post-Bretton Woods Financialization.” Radical History Review 118: 113–138. https://doi.org/10.1215/01636545-2349142 Abstract This essay seeks to draw connections between, on the one hand, the financialization of the global economy and everyday life in the post – Bretton Woods era (post-1973) and, on the other, the …

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Walmart, Finance, and the Cultural Politics of Securitization (2013)

Citation Haiven, Max. 2013. “Walmart, Finance, and the Cultural Politics of Securitization.” Cultural Politics 9 (2): 239-262. https://doi.org/10.1215/17432197-2346964 Abstract Walmart is not only the world’s single largest retailer and private employer, it is also a crystallization and an agent of a broader paradigm shift toward “securitization”: the convergence of financial and security-oriented logics of risk …

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Finance Depends on Resistance, Finance Is Resistance, and, Anyway, Resistance Is Futile (2013)

Citation Haiven, Max. 2013. “Finance Depends on Resistance, Finance Is Resistance, and, Anyway, Resistance Is Futile.” Mediations 26 (1–2): 85–106. http://www.mediationsjournal.org/articles/finance-depends-on-resistance Abstract Occupy Wall Street and the dawning of worldwide anti-austerity movements have occasioned a consideration of the economic and political power of financial speculation and raised the question of how it might be resisted. …

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